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“It’s not just locals looking to work their way up in the film industry. Carpenters, clothing makers, construction crews are able to lock down a few months of work thanks to the needs of a large-scale production. Local businesses become partners in production, as shooting locations or providers of other resources.”

Kirk Gunton

 

Film Reel: 

A LITTLE ABOUT YOU AND THE CRAFT:

Filmmaking Specialty: Post-production, Digital Media Management
# Years Experience: 6
A little about your journey as a filmmaker: The phrase “my journey” can lead one to write generic platitudes, so I’ll keep things succinct. Went to film school: Western Carolina University. Five Years Later: Throwing myself into projects across the Carolinas, learning from every location shoot and editing session. Producing content for local clients in WNC, my own stuff for the delight of the Internet. Journey Status: On-going.
Equipment You Use on Typical Project: Canon T3i, Tascam Audio Recorder, MacBook Pro (Adobe Premiere, After Effects)
Majority of Recent Projects: Reality, Web Series
Notable Clients: Asheville Tourism, Special Olympics Wilkes County, Wilkesboro Baptist Church

 

YOUR TRACK RECORD:

Largest Project: NatGeo TV’s “Doomsday Castle” (as Media Manager)
Notable Mentors: Terry Curtis Fox, John Litschke, James Suttles
Notable Projects: “Toddy & Deano’s Keeping It Tight Tour”, “The Kirk Show”
Festival Screenings/Awards: ConCarolinas Short Film Festival 2015, 48 Hour Film Project

 

JUST FOR FUN

A recent a ha moment: If the aim is to get millions of Facebook Likes and “go viral,” I’ve lost the point. The far greater priority is to develop my “voice” and present a point-of-view that I can stand behind.
The next exciting thing. Some folks I’ve worked with are in the midst of creating a one-stop shop for independent film resources called IndieFilm.org. They will feature a range of contributors from the local industry covering every step of the process from script to screen: articles, interviews, and documents available for indie film crews across the country.
The importance of story. Story is one of the few things that gets passed down for millennia. It’s above the language barrier, too. It’s EXPERIENCE in a streamlined, digestible package. In films, often confused with an excess of plot.
The last film you watched before you knew you wanted to make films? I turned 13 in 2001, which was a pretty good year to discover films that were very different from the mainstream fare I grew up with. That’s when the idea crystallized that there were people with a vision who made what I saw on screen. “Donnie Darko” (wr/dir Richard Kelly), “Memento” (wr/dir Christopher Nolan), “Mulholland Drive” (wr/dir David Lynch).
Who are the best filmmakers alive? Some of the best filmmakers are now making television. Call your local cable & Internet provider.

 

NOT TO GET POLITICAL BUT…

Thoughts on how film benefits a city? Even if, as so often happens, your city is subbing for another one (e.g., Cleveland becomes “New York” in The Avengers) it raises your city’s profile: a tourism advertisement with a $100 mil budget. Visiting LA or NYC crews need shelter, food, entertainment— the hosting city is there to provide it, and get the influx of cash.
How has social media changed the business of film? Social media is basically a full-time job on top of all the aspects of actually producing and selling a film. Studio marketers have gradually caught on to this idea for an extra boost of buzz, but for indie or web filmmakers it is invaluable. Trailers will be on Facebook before they’re ever screened in a theater. For micro-budget projects, often the only way to get eyeballs on your work is with a ferocious campaign on all the social media channels.
What have you seen as the affects of losing the NC Film Incentives? Mass exodus of talent and crews, relocating to where the grass is greener for film and TV work. NC’s loss is [Fill in the blank here]’s gain.
Film = Jobs..?  Explain. It’s not just locals looking to work their way up in the film industry. Carpenters, clothing makers, construction crews are able to lock down a few months of work thanks to the needs of a large-scale production. Local businesses become partners in production, as shooting locations or providers of other resources.
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